Document Type

Thesis

Publication Date

2013

Abstract

In their respective novels The Waves and The Sound and the Fury, Virginia Woolf and William Faulkner establish focal points in narration; each author uses narrative strategy to trace characters and voices’ mind processes, languages, and interactions. Each novel reads like a snapshot of these narrated worlds without omniscient authorial guidance, leaving the reader to decipher the language and codes on the page. Accordingly, the barrier these narrative languages face are both within the page and without, as translation requires a committed reader who wants to learn the language, a reader who, even when the voices spiral off the page, resists tossing the novel across the room. Give the double problem of translating these novels, my project is to dissect and explore the language in each, outlining and comparing their key features, as well as indicating what barriers these languages face in “speaking” in the narrative.

Comments

Approved by: Ozzie Mayers, Jessica Harkins, Mara Faulkner OSB, Cynthia N. Malone, Anthony Cunningham

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