Piety and Politics: The Dynamics of Royal Authority in Homeric Greece, Biblical Israel, and Old Babylonian Mesopotamia

Title

Piety and Politics: The Dynamics of Royal Authority in Homeric Greece, Biblical Israel, and Old Babylonian Mesopotamia

Files

Link to WorldCat

Click here for this book

Description

In Homeric Greece, Biblical Israel, and Old Mesopotamia, the king was said to be installed by divine appointment and was regarded as having a special and privileged relationship with God or the gods. This comparative and thematic study assesses the role of the king as a divine messenger and his use of, and reliance on, piety to legitimate his position and ensure the compliance of his subjects. Based on a variety of texts from each of the three regions, including poetry, philosophy, history and theological works, Launderville examines the rhetoric of royal legitimation. He also looks at what the community expected from the king as the centralising symbol of the community, the chief messenger from the divine world and the dispenser of justice, and he explores the means by which the king's power and privileged position could be kept in check.

Publisher’s Website

Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.

ISBN

0802839940 9780802839947

Publication Date

2003

Publisher

Wm. B. Eerdmans

City

Grand Rapids, Mich.

Keywords

Saint John's Abbey Books, Theology Faculty Book Gallery

Disciplines

Arts and Humanities | Christianity | History | Islamic World and Near East History | Religion

Piety and Politics: The Dynamics of Royal Authority in Homeric Greece, Biblical Israel, and Old Babylonian Mesopotamia

Share

COinS