Document Type

Thesis

Publication Date

1993

Advisor

Jan Holtz

Abstract

This study assessed men's social-sexual effectiveness and attitudes toward women, and investigated their apparent association. The present study investigated how these two measures, in a sample of college males,develop over time through maturation and program intervention. It was predicted that both male social-sexual effectiveness and attitudes toward women would be positively correlated, and that the measures would show an improvement in the subjects' confidence relating to women and in less traditional attitudes toward women. It was also expected that those subjects who experienced the program intervention which was aimed at instilling greater gender sensitivity in men, would show the most change in the anticipated directions. The subjects completed two anonymous self-report measures of (a) social-sexual effectiveness and (b) attitudes toward women on two different occasions over a period of approximately three months. Results indicated that the program intervention was ineffective; that the subjects' attitudes became more traditional; and that social-sexual effectiveness and attitudes toward women were not positively correlated. Theoretical issues and educational implications were discussed.

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Psychology Commons

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